About

The Roman Senate House.
Photo by the author.
 
     RESPVBLICA (rays-public-ah) is Latin for Republic. CONSVLTVS (con-sull-tus) is Latin for lawyer and the handle of your author, who for professional reasons must remain anonymous for the time being. The American tradition of using a Latin pseudonym for political commentary goes back to The Federalist. CONSVLTVS began this web log in August 2010, after a particularly exasperating court ruling from California (“The Last Straw, the First Post, Parts I & II”). Your author is an amateur student of history, literature, philosophy, and science. For thirty years he has observed the changes in American society. In his opinion, these changes have been a mixed bag. On the one hand, the release from many prejudices of the past is clearly a social good. On the other hand, in rejecting traditional prejudices Americans have also rejected traditional virtues.

Senatorial grant of Tribunician Power to the Emperor Vespasian.
Photo by the author.
     There are not all that many examples of free nations in history, and most of them have tended to follow the same course: Liberty yields to chaos, chaos yields to tyranny. As the pace of change in the United States accelerates, Americans are in danger of losing their liberty one way or another. CONSVLTVS believes that any successful plan for navigating the approaching rapids will take full account of history. Hence, the RESPVBLICA masthead contains a Roman lamp, not to invoke The Enlightenment so much as to suggest the light history can shine on current events.

Temple of Hercules Victor.
Photo by the author.
     A word on the use of Latin: This blog is for discussing ideas and issues with political implications. It is not for taking partisan stands or endorsing candidates. A bit of Latin may help remove the conversation from the immediacy of partisanship. It may also encourage a long view, reminding us of our cultural heritage.

     On civility: Vigorous discussion is welcome and expected on issues about which people feel strongly. However, obscene language is not allowed. Comments not adhering to this principle will be redacted, if possible, or simply not published.

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